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Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge review: Samsung’s best phones in years

Samsung found itself in sort of a bind last year: Its flagship Galaxy S5 wasn’t the blockbuster the company hoped it would be. That, coupled with the news that Samsung was going to focus on a smaller number of devices in 2015, signaled a pretty dramatic change for a brand that seemed like it was unstoppable. As if to silence the doubters, Samsung has not one, but two flagships on offer — the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge — and they’re surrounded by questions. Can they restore Samsung to its former glory? Has the company figured out how to build a truly interesting smartphone again? It’s too early to make a call on the former, but after a week of testing, the answer to the latter is a clear and definite “yes.”

Pros

  • Sturdy, stylish design
  • Impeccable camera experience
  • Great day-to-day performance
  • TouchWiz is finally worth using

Cons

  • Battery life could be better
  • Fingerprint sensor can be flaky
  • It’s not waterproof
  • No microSD or removable battery
Summary

Samsung has a lot riding on its 2015 flagship, and this time it’s put its best foot forward. With its super-fast, homebrew processor, a pair of great cameras and a surprisingly clean version of TouchWiz, the S6 is the finest Galaxy Samsung has ever made. Now, if only it were waterproof.

Pros

  • Stunning design
  • The curved screen is gorgeous
  • Impeccable camera experience
  • Great day-to-day performance

Cons

  • The curved screen doesn’t do much
  • Battery life could be better
  • No microSD or removable battery
  • It’s not waterproof
Summary

This more expensive version of the Galaxy S6 banks it all on looks. It performs just as well as its cousin in every task we threw at it, but the few software gimmicks that make use of the Edge’s beautiful curved display just don’t do much to justify the extra cost. Buy it for its looks, not because it’s any more functional.

Hardware

Before we go any further, know this: Aside from the obvious differences — the Edge has a wrap-around screen and a few software tricks that take advantage of it — the Galaxy S6 and the S6 Edge are basically identical. Same screen size, same 16-megapixel cameras, same octa-core Exynos 7420 brains, and so on. They’re two devices crafted with the same metal, glass and silicon, which makes the dramatic design differences between them all the more meaningful.

Looking at it dead on, though, the S6 is pretty plain. Your eyes will immediately get sucked into the 5.1-inch Quad HD Super AMOLED screen, but a 5-megapixel selfie camera sits above it while the Home button lies below, flanked by discrete Back and Recent Apps keys. High on the S6’s back is a squarish plateau that houses the 16-megapixel camera, and to the right lies a tiny black divot where the LED flash and heart rate sensor live. Unlike the crater that marked the Galaxy S5’s back, the assembly here is almost flush with the S6’s rear. It’s a small touch, but it makes taking heart rate and blood oxygen readings in S Health quite a bit easier.

Really, it’s details like these that speak most loudly to Samsung’s new design philosophy. Let’s put aside for a moment the fact that Samsung traded its trademark plastic bodies for sturdy metal frames and Gorilla Glass 4 panels lining the S6’s front and back. What’s more important — and consequently harder to express in words — are the little touches that tie everything together. The S6’s rounded sides are punctuated by a flat edge for your fingers to rest on. The gaps between the metal and Gorilla Glass are so fine as to be imperceptible. The sole speaker has been moved to the phone’s bottom so you’re not blasting tunes straight into your desk. I could go on, but the S6 just feels seamless in a way its predecessor never did.

And no, your eyes don’t deceive you: The Galaxy S6 looks (and feels) an awful lot like an iPhone. From those rounded sides to the chrome-rimmed, fingerprint-sensing Home button to placement of the volume buttons on the left edge and the power button on the right, there’s an odd air of familiarity surrounding the thing. (A brief aside: One of Samsung’s spokespeople picked up my iPhone 6 during our hands-on time in February and it seemed to take him a few moments to realize what he was actually holding.) Flame wars on the matter are already starting to brew, but I’m not too concerned; Samsung’s end result is lovely, and that’s all most people will care about.

Alas, though, streamlining the S6’s design meant taking an axe to some of the things that endeared the Galaxy line to persnickety nerds — namely, the removable battery and microSD card slot. My T-Mobile review unit came with 32GB of internal storage ($0 down with monthly payments on T-Mo, or $199 with a contract elsewhere), but you’ll soon be able to buy 64GB and 128GB models too. And the biggest heartbreak? The S6 breaks tradition by dying when you drop it in a pool. The news will be more tragic for some than others but not having to handle the S5 with kid gloves was a treat. Hopefully Samsung figures out a way to waterproof a design like this before next year rolls around.

Now, about the Edge ($299 with a contract). It’s equal parts gorgeous and gimmicky, but if money is no object, the former definitely outweighs the latter. Unlike the G Flex2, the Edge’s curved screen falls away from you at the sides instead of angling toward you from the top and bottom. The design does nothing to make the screen more immersive, but that doesn’t matter; the screen’s novelty and beauty still mean it’s hard to tear your eyes off it. The S6 Edge feels substantially thinner than its basic cousin because of how its sides taper to a super-slim edge. This trick is a familiar one — Motorola has done it with every Moto X to date — but it keeps getting recycled for a reason. The thing is, the Edge will probably never nestle comfortably into your hands as a result; if your fingers are like mine, they’ll forever arch over its back, which can sometimes feel a little precarious. In fact, at times I wished the curve were on the opposite side just so the rest of my hand had something to hang onto. On the plus side, that extra space along the Edge’s sides gives you room to swipe up, down, left and right without your thumb ever obscuring the action. Really, though, these navigational benefits feel like an afterthought, like happy little accidents that came about thanks to Samsung’s screen-shape decision. Make no mistake: The Edge’s main job is to look good.

HP Spectre x360 review: What happens when Microsoft helps build a laptop?

HP Spectre x360 review: What happens when Microsoft helps build a laptop?

The Spectre x360 is HP’s newest flagship notebook. It’s also probably the closest you’ll get to seeing Microsoft build its own laptop. You see, though the machine has Hewlett-Packard’s name on it, HP designed it in close collaboration with engineers from the Windows team, optimizing everything from the fan noise to the screen’s color gamut. The result is a well-built laptop with fast performance, long battery life and a nearly bloatware-free version of Windows. And at $900 to start, it undercuts almost all of its rivals. Is there anything not to like?

The Spectre x360 is HP’s newest flagship notebook. It’s also probably the closest you’ll get to seeing Microsoft build its own laptop. You see, though the machine has Hewlett-Packard’s name on it, HP designed it in close collaboration with engineers from the Windows team, optimizing everything from the fan noise to the screen’s color gamut. The result is a well-built laptop with fast performance, long battery life and a nearly bloatware-free version of Windows. And at $900 to start, it undercuts almost all of its rivals. Is there anything not to like?

Still, HP managed to improve on what’s otherwise a tried-and-true formula. Take the hinge, for instance. Though it feels as smooth and controlled as anything Lenovo ever produced, HP’s version uses a different kind of mechanism that “folds into itself” (to quote what I was told when I first saw it). This allows the machine to be equally thick regardless of whether the screen is in tablet mode or folded shut, like a regular notebook. Speaking of thickness, the machine measures 15.9mm (or 0.63 inch), with the weight coming in at a relatively heavy 1.44kg, or 3.17 pounds on the Quad HD model. In fact, the x360 is actually 3.26 pounds on the full HD version (one panel is thinner than the other).

Either way, it feels noticeably denser than a typical 13-inch Ultrabook, and it’s definitely heavier than the super-light Yoga 3 Pro. That’s irrelevant if you plan to park it on your desk and use it in Stand or Tent mode to watch movies, and it doesn’t even really matter when you use the thing as a regular notebook — it’s still easy to tote around in your backpack or shoulder bag. What you might find, though, is that a relatively large, 13-inch PC like this, particularly one this heavy, isn’t well-suited for tablet mode. If you do choose to use it that way, I suggest resting it on your lap; holding up a three-plus-pound device gets tiresome after exactly five seconds.

On the plus side, at least, a slightly bulkier machine means fewer compromises when it comes to ports. On board, we have three USB 3.0 connections, along with a full-sized HDMI socket, a Mini DisplayPort, an SD card slot, a headphone jack and a volume rocker, for use in tablet mode. That’s no small thing at a time when some laptop makers are trying to get away with including just one port. Finally, HP sells Ethernet and HDMI-to-VGA adapters for $30 apiece. (In my first look, I initially said they came in the box, but that’s not true; HP just included them gratis for us reviewers.)

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In addition to that lie-flat hinge, the keyboard and trackpad are also entirely HP’s — and in some ways they’re better than the competition, too. The metal buttons have a similar spacious, island-style layout as many rival machines, except the keys have a full 1.5mm of travel, making them much cushier than what I’m used to on Ultrabooks. (Perhaps this is one benefit to having a slightly thicker machine: less of a reason to settle for a flat, lifeless keyboard.) In addition, I appreciate how relatively quiet the buttons are, even despite their springiness. Also, most of the keys are large enough that I can find them by feel, without having to worry about hitting the wrong one. Even the arrow keys — some of the few shrunken buttons here — were easy to get to when I wanted to highlight text.

What’s funny is that although HP teamed up with Microsoft on this, it didn’t use one of Microsoft’s own “Precision” touchpads; instead, it went with a clickpad from Synaptics. Make that an extra-wide clickpad — the trackpad here has much the same elongated shape as on the Spectre 13, HP’s last-generation flagship. When that model first came out, the idea was that people could use so-called touch zones on either end of the trackpad to more easily pull off certain gestures specific to Windows 8 — you know, like swiping in from the right to expose the Charms Bar. As it happens, the Charms Bar is about to go away in Windows 10 (set to launch in a few months) and so, there are no touch zones here, per se; just one really wide touchpad. HP figured, even if you don’t need those zones anymore, you might still enjoy having the extra horizontal space. I have to say I do.

In general, the touchpad is reliable; the cursor almost always goes where I intended, and multitouch gestures like two-finger scrolls work well, too. I would prefer a slightly lower-friction touch surface, but if a little more drag means more accurate tracking, then that’s fine. Better that than a smooth touchpad that doesn’t actually do what I want it to.

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The x360 comes standard with a 1080p, optically bonded touchscreen, but is also offered with a 2,560 x 1,440 panel for an extra hundred bucks. Unfortunately, I’ve only had the chance to test the full HD edition, so I can’t tell you firsthand just how pixel-dense the Quad HD option is. But I think I can guess, and I bet you can too. If you think the 13-inch MacBook Pro’s 2,560 x 1,600 display is gorgeous, you will probably appreciate this as well. As it is, I didn’t find myself pining for the sharper panel, especially considering how great the battery life is when you settle for the lower resolution. Thanks to a 72 percent color gamut, the tones here are nice and rich, though not overly saturated. Also, though the viewing angles on this IPS screen aren’t perfect, they’re wide enough that I could still watch movies and get work done with the screen dipped forward, within a certain range of flexibility. As for audio, the dual speakers on the laptop’s bottom side exhibit some of the tinniness I’ve come to expect from notebooks, but it’s no worse than what I’ve observed on other machines.